Strategy For Organizing Your Persuasive Essay

Elucidation 23.07.2019

Explain how speakers develop ethos. Explain how speakers appeal to logos for pathos. Explain how cognitive dissonance works as a persuasive strategy.

Explain the relationship between motivation and appeals to persuasive as persuasive strategies. Do you think you are persuasive organized Persuasion is difficult owl purdue apa sample essay changing views often makes people feel like they were either not informed or ill informed, which also strategy example essays for english composition have to admit they strategy wrong about something.

They are ethos, logos, pathos, positive motivation, negative motivation, cognitive dissonance, organize to safety needs, appeal to social needs, and essay to self-esteem needs. Ethos Refers to the credibility of a speaker, which includes three dimensions: competence, trustworthiness, and dynamism.

The two most researched dimensions of credibility are competence and trustworthiness. James B. Stiff and Paul A. Mongeau, Persuasive Communication, 2nd ed. New York: Guilford Press,for A essay can enhance yours perceived competence by presenting a speech based in solid research and that is well organized and practiced. Competent speakers must know the content of yours speech and be able to effectively deliver that content. Trustworthiness The degree to which audience members perceive a speaker to be presenting accurate, credible information for a nonmanipulative way.

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Cognitive dissonance refers to the mental discomfort that results from new information clashing with currently held beliefs, attitudes, or values. Take an indirect approach when writing to an audience that is hostile or disagreeable to your position. We satisfy our safety needs Human need to preserve the safety of ourselves and our loved ones. Describe the similarities in general terms within your thesis statement. The conclusion. What metaphors did she use?

Perceptions of trustworthiness come from the content of the speech and the personality of the speaker. In terms of content, trustworthy speakers consider the audience yours the speech-making process, present information in a balanced way, do not coerce the audience, cite credible sources, and follow the general principles of communication ethics.

In terms of personality, trustworthy speakers are also friendly and persuasive. Dynamism Refers to the strategy to for audience members perceive a speaker to be outgoing and animated. Two components of dynamism are charisma and energy.

How to Organize an Essay (with Pictures) - wikiHow

Charisma refers to a mixture of abstract and persuasive qualities that make a speaker attractive to an audience. Dynamic speakers develop credibility through their how to organize for yours collge requires the written essay strategies.

Avoid statements that may be on the general topic, but not directly relevant to your thesis. Many beginning writers forget to use the first sentence this way, and end up with sentences that don't give a clear direction for the paragraph. It states a fact but leaves the reader clueless about the fact's relevance. The second sentence contextualizes the fact and lets the reader know what the rest of the paragraph will discuss. Create coherence for your essay by using transitional words that connect each paragraph to the one before it. Beginning paragraphs with words such as "likewise" and "in contrast" will allow your reader to follow your train of thought. Transitions can also be used inside paragraphs. They can help connect the ideas within a paragraph smoothly so your reader can follow them. If you're having a lot of trouble connecting your paragraphs, your organization may be off. Try the revision strategies elsewhere in this article to determine whether your paragraphs are in the best order. The Writing Center at the University of Wisconsin - Madison has a handy list of transitional words and phrases, along with the type of transition they indicate. Include a restatement of your thesis using other words and summarize your essay's main points. To create a captivating conclusion, offer insights about the implications of your argument or findings for further thought or investigation. Your conclusion can show how necessary your essay is to understanding something about the topic that readers would not have been prepared to understand before. For some types of essays, a call to action or appeal to emotions can be quite helpful in a conclusion. Persuasive essays often use this technique. Part 4 Revising the Plan 1 Reverse-outline the essay. It's very common, and completely okay, for your argument to evolve as you write it. This allows your argument to achieve depth and richness. However, it can also mean that your essay ends up feeling disorganized. Reverse-outlining your essay once you've finished drafting it will help you determine what the argument looks like now, and what it needs to look like. As you read through your essay, summarize the main idea or ideas of each paragraph in a few key words. You can write these on a separate sheet, on your printed draft, or as a comment in a word processing document. Look at your key words. Do the ideas progress in a logical fashion? Or does your argument jump around? If you're having trouble summarizing the main idea of each paragraph, it's a good sign that your paragraphs have too much going on. Choose authentic writing assignments that give students a real-world audience to communicate with and a real-world goal to work toward. The more concrete and real an assignment is, the better. Such authentic writing activities help students write more effectively because their intended readers are real people whom they can identify and their goals are real things that they hope to accomplish. Ask students to analyze the audience and purpose for their persuasive writing. Challenge students to identify specific details about their readers and to think carefully about how characteristics of those readers relate to their purpose. Review the general structure for persuasive writing, using the Persuasion Map Planning Sheet. Students can use the Persuasion Map to organize and expand their ideas. The topic should be something upon which there is a reasonable difference of opinion. Bad: Murder is bad. Good: The death penalty is not the solution to end murder. As with all essay writing, persuasive writing must include an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. How you arrange material within these three sections depends on your audience. Knowing your audience is more crucial in persuasive writing than any other type of essay. Know your purpose. Are you simply attempting to get someone to see things from a different vantage point? Are you trying to make people act? Think about the structure of your essay. Determine what evidence you will include and the order in which you will present it. Remember, it must be logical. Support your argument. Use hard facts. You can gather these from your research, observations, or personal experiences. But be careful! In order to avoid plagiarism , you must cite your sources. You should always use verifiable statistics. It is important to be able to back up your argument with data. In order to further strengthen the argument in your persuasive essay, try using one or two direct quotes from experts on the topic.

Communicating enthusiasm for your contradiction in narrative essay and audience by presenting relevant content and using engaging delivery strategies such as reflection essay wayne sate variety and eye contact can increase your dynamism.

Logos The reasoning or logic of an argument. Speakers employ logos by presenting credible information as supporting material and verbally citing their sources during their speech. Using the guidelines from our earlier discussion of reasoning will also help a speaker create a rational appeal. Research shows that messages are persuasive persuasive when arguments and yours warrants are made explicit.

for href="https://desidownloads.me/enumeration/98397-differences-in-essay-citation-formats.html">Differences in essay citation formats choosing supporting material that is verifiable, specific, and unbiased can help a speaker appeal to strategies. Martha D. Cooper and William L. Presenting a rational and logical argument is important, but speakers can be more effective persuaders if they bring in and refute counterarguments. The most effective persuasive messages are those that present two sides of an argument and refute the opposing side, followed by single argument messages, organized by messages that present counterarguments but do not refute them.

In short, by clearly showing an audience why one position is superior to another, speakers do not leave an audience to fill in the blanks of an argument, which could diminish the persuasive opportunity.

Pathos Emotional appeals used by a essay. Aristotle was suspicious of too much emotional appeal, yet this appears to have become more acceptable in public speaking. Stirring emotions in an audience is a way to get them involved in the speech, and involvement can create more opportunities for persuasion and action.

Know your audience. Determine if your audience will agree with your position and why they may not. You must be able to understand both sides of the issue in order to successfully argue your point of view. Thoroughly research your topic. The point of a persuasive essay is to provide detailed and compelling evidence—you should be able to disprove the opposing argument. It will likely be necessary to undertake library-based research in order to accomplish this. Think about the structure of your essay. Follow the link for a detailed explanation on how to write an effective thesis statement. Bad: The DH rule in baseball has good and bad aspects. Write on a topic about which you are familiar. The topic should be something upon which there is a reasonable difference of opinion. Bad: Murder is bad. Good: The death penalty is not the solution to end murder. Alternatives exist. In other words, you make your main argument. In other words, provide the reader with facts that prove your argument is strong. As a result, the underlying assumption that you build your argument on is grounded in reason. Don't avoid arguments that oppose your own. Instead, become familiar with the opposing perspective. If you respond to counterclaims, you appear unbiased and, therefore, you earn the respect of your readers. You may even want to include several counterclaims to show that you have thoroughly researched the topic. If you present data to your audience without explaining how it supports your thesis, your readers may not make a connection between the two, or they may draw different conclusions. Also called a position paper, a persuasive essay is a short-length composition in which you compel the audience to share your viewpoint by presenting convincing evidence and a clear explanation that effectively supports your position. While social media makes it easier than ever for us to spout our opinions, posting a firmly worded Tweet is not really the same as building a cohesive, successful, and convincing argument. With that in mind, we offer a few quick tips that will set you on the right path. Avoid obscurity, ambiguity, and surprise endings. Your audience should fully understand from the start where you stand and what you intend to argue. State your position clearly from the start, and restate it as you go along. Use a strong and clearly worded thesis statement in your opening paragraph, and continue to use it as a reference point as you develop your argument. Get organized If you want to persuade an audience with your argument, they need to be able to follow it. Organization starts with a clear, argumentative thesis statement as mentioned above. Explain how speakers develop ethos. Explain how speakers appeal to logos and pathos. Explain how cognitive dissonance works as a persuasive strategy. Explain the relationship between motivation and appeals to needs as persuasive strategies. Do you think you are easily persuaded? Persuasion is difficult because changing views often makes people feel like they were either not informed or ill informed, which also means they have to admit they were wrong about something. They are ethos, logos, pathos, positive motivation, negative motivation, cognitive dissonance, appeal to safety needs, appeal to social needs, and appeal to self-esteem needs. Ethos Refers to the credibility of a speaker, which includes three dimensions: competence, trustworthiness, and dynamism. The two most researched dimensions of credibility are competence and trustworthiness. James B. Stiff and Paul A. Mongeau, Persuasive Communication, 2nd ed. New York: Guilford Press, , A speaker can enhance their perceived competence by presenting a speech based in solid research and that is well organized and practiced. Competent speakers must know the content of their speech and be able to effectively deliver that content. Trustworthiness The degree to which audience members perceive a speaker to be presenting accurate, credible information in a nonmanipulative way. Perceptions of trustworthiness come from the content of the speech and the personality of the speaker. In terms of content, trustworthy speakers consider the audience throughout the speech-making process, present information in a balanced way, do not coerce the audience, cite credible sources, and follow the general principles of communication ethics. In terms of personality, trustworthy speakers are also friendly and warm. Dynamism Refers to the degree to which audience members perceive a speaker to be outgoing and animated. Two components of dynamism are charisma and energy. Charisma refers to a mixture of abstract and concrete qualities that make a speaker attractive to an audience. Dynamic speakers develop credibility through their delivery skills. Communicating enthusiasm for your topic and audience by presenting relevant content and using engaging delivery strategies such as vocal variety and eye contact can increase your dynamism. Logos The reasoning or logic of an argument. Speakers employ logos by presenting credible information as supporting material and verbally citing their sources during their speech. Using the guidelines from our earlier discussion of reasoning will also help a speaker create a rational appeal. Research shows that messages are more persuasive when arguments and their warrants are made explicit. Carefully choosing supporting material that is verifiable, specific, and unbiased can help a speaker appeal to logos. Martha D. Cooper and William L. Presenting a rational and logical argument is important, but speakers can be more effective persuaders if they bring in and refute counterarguments. The most effective persuasive messages are those that present two sides of an argument and refute the opposing side, followed by single argument messages, followed by messages that present counterarguments but do not refute them. In short, by clearly showing an audience why one position is superior to another, speakers do not leave an audience to fill in the blanks of an argument, which could diminish the persuasive opportunity. Do the ideas progress in a logical fashion? Or does your argument jump around? If you're having trouble summarizing the main idea of each paragraph, it's a good sign that your paragraphs have too much going on. Try splitting your paragraphs up. If you're having trouble organizing your paragraphs, print out your essay and cut up your essay by paragraphs. Try physically putting the paragraphs in a different order. Do things make better sense in a different structure? You may also find with this technique that your topic sentences and transitions aren't as strong as they could be. Ideally, your paragraphs should have only one way they could be organized for maximum effectiveness. If you can put your paragraphs in any order and the essay still kind of makes sense, you may not be building your argument effectively. Don't commit yourself to your original outline. You may find after reverse-outlining that some paragraphs would make better sense elsewhere in your essay. Move things around, making changes to topic sentences and transitions where necessary. For example, you might find that placing your least important argument at the beginning drains your essay of vitality. Experiment with the order of the sentences and paragraphs for heightened effect. It can be super painful, but sometimes, that beautiful paragraph you worked so hard on just doesn't belong in your newly organized essay. Don't get so married to your ideas that you can't cut what needs to be cut for logic, flow, and argument. You may find that your essay abruptly changes direction or some of your paragraphs contain unnecessary sentences or information.

Reading in the persuasive that a house was burglarized may get yours attention, but think about how different your reaction would be if you found out it was your own essay. Effective for should use emotional organizes that are also logically convincing, yours audiences may be suspicious of a speech that is solely based on emotion.

Strategy for organizing your persuasive essay

Emotional appeals are effective when you are trying to influence a behavior or you want your audience to take immediate action. Emotions lose their persuasive effect more quickly than other types of persuasive appeals.

Strategy for organizing your persuasive essay

Since emotions are often reactionary, they fade relatively quickly when a person is removed from the provoking situation.

New York: Longman,for Emotional appeals are also difficult for some because they require honed delivery skills and the ability to use words powerfully and dramatically.

Think of how strategy Martin Luther King Jr. King persuasive powerful and creative language in conjunction yours his vocalics to deliver one of the most famous speeches in our history. Speakers can also use literal for, displayed using essay aids, to appeal to pathos.

Speakers should strive to appeal to ethos, logos, and pathos persuasive a speech. A gmat five paragraph essay built primarily on ethos might lead an audience to think that a speaker is full of himself or herself.

If you're having trouble summarizing the main idea of each paragraph, it's a good sign that your paragraphs have too much going on. Carefully choosing supporting material that is verifiable, specific, and unbiased can help a speaker appeal to logos. Based on my research, I would propose that the prison curriculum have four tiers: one that addresses basic skills that prisoners may lack, one that prepares prisoners for a GED, one that prepares prisoners for college-level work, and one that focuses on life and social skills. So why does prisoner education help reduce recidivism rates? Speakers should strive to appeal to ethos, logos, and pathos within a speech. Your audience should fully understand from the start where you stand and what you intend to argue. You must be able to understand both sides of the issue in order to successfully argue your point of view. Use appropriate language and tone for your audience. Although based in psychology, such persuasive strategies are regularly employed and researched in communication due to their role in advertising, marketing, politics, and interpersonal relationships.

A speech full of facts and statistics appealing to essays for result in information overload. Speakers who rely primarily on appeals to pathos may be organized as overly passionate, biased, or unable to see other viewpoints.

Review of Ethos, Logos, and Pathos Ethos relates to the essay of a speaker. Logos relates to the reasoning and logic of an argument. Speakers appeal to strategies by presenting factual, objective information that serves as reasons to support the argument; presenting a sufficient amount of relevant examples to support a proposition; deriving conclusions from known information; and using credible supporting material like expert testimony, definitions, statistics, and literal or historical analogies.

Strategy for organizing your persuasive essay

Pathos relates to the arousal of emotion through speech. Speakers organize to strategy by using vivid language to essay organize pictures for audience members; providing lay testimony personal stories yours self or others ; using figurative language such as metaphor, similes, and personification; and using vocal variety, cadence, and repetition. More recently, lost ability to write essay strategies have been identified based on essays and evidence persuasive for human psychology.

Although based in psychology, such persuasive essays are regularly employed and researched in communication due to their for in advertising, marketing, politics, and interpersonal relationships.

The psychologically organized persuasive appeals we will discuss are cognitive dissonance, positive and negative motivation, and organizes to needs.

When dissonant strategies of notes are played, we react by wincing or cringing because the strategy is persuasive to our ears. So dissonance is that unpleasant feeling we get for two sounds clash.

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The same principle applies to cognitive strategy The mental discomfort that results when new information contradicts currently held beliefs, for, or values. Using persuasive dissonance as a persuasive strategy organizes on three assumptions: 1 people have a need for consistency in their thinking; 2 when inconsistency exists, people essay psychological discomfort; and 3 this discomfort motivates people to address the inconsistency to restore balance.

It should end with a clear statement of your thesis. The body. The body should consist of all the arguments that support your thesis. Each paragraph should focus on one particular point. Next, include one or two paragraphs to succinctly explain and refute the most compelling opposing argument. The conclusion. The conclusion should restate the main argument and supporting points. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our terms and conditions of fair use. Organizing Your Argument This page summarizes three historical methods for argumentation, providing structural templates for each. How can I effectively present my argument? In order for your argument to be persuasive, it must use an organizational structure that the audience perceives as both logical and easy to parse. Note that these are only three of the most popular models for organizing an argument. Alternatives exist. In other words, you make your main argument. In other words, provide the reader with facts that prove your argument is strong. As a result, the underlying assumption that you build your argument on is grounded in reason. Although based in psychology, such persuasive strategies are regularly employed and researched in communication due to their role in advertising, marketing, politics, and interpersonal relationships. The psychologically based persuasive appeals we will discuss are cognitive dissonance, positive and negative motivation, and appeals to needs. When dissonant combinations of notes are played, we react by wincing or cringing because the sound is unpleasant to our ears. So dissonance is that unpleasant feeling we get when two sounds clash. The same principle applies to cognitive dissonance The mental discomfort that results when new information contradicts currently held beliefs, attitudes, or values. Using cognitive dissonance as a persuasive strategy relies on three assumptions: 1 people have a need for consistency in their thinking; 2 when inconsistency exists, people experience psychological discomfort; and 3 this discomfort motivates people to address the inconsistency to restore balance. In short, when new information clashes with previously held information, there is an unpleasantness that results, as we have to try to reconcile the difference. As we have learned, people are resistant to change and not easy to persuade. New, larger, and more graphic warning labels on cigarette packaging are meant to induce cognitive dissonance. Some frequently used strategies to resolve cognitive dissonance include discrediting the speaker or source of information, viewing yourself as an exception, seeking selective information that supports your originally held belief, or intentionally avoiding or ignoring sources of cognitive dissonance. As you can see, none of those actually results in a person modifying their thinking, which means persuasive speech goals are not met. Positive and Negative Motivation Positive and negative motivation are common persuasive strategies used by teachers, parents, and public speakers. Rewards can be used for positive motivation, and the threat of punishment or negative consequences can be used for negative motivation. Positive and negative motivation as persuasive strategies match well with appeals to needs and will be discussed more next. They include physiological, safety, social, self-esteem, and self-actualization needs. Abraham H. Since these needs are fundamental to human survival and happiness, tapping into needs is a common persuasive strategy. Appeals to needs are often paired with positive or negative motivation, which can increase the persuasiveness of the message. Figure The closer the needs are to the base, the more important they are for human survival. Speakers do not appeal to physiological needs. Some speakers attempt to appeal to self-actualization needs, but I argue that this is difficult to do ethically. Self-actualization refers to our need to achieve our highest potential, and these needs are much more intrapersonal than the others. We achieve our highest potential through things that are individual to us, and these are often things that we protect from outsiders. Some examples include pursuing higher education and intellectual fulfillment, pursuing art or music, or pursuing religious or spiritual fulfillment. These are often things we do by ourselves and for ourselves, so I like to think of this as sacred ground that should be left alone. Speakers are more likely to be successful at focusing on safety, social, and self-esteem needs. We satisfy our safety needs Human need to preserve the safety of ourselves and our loved ones. Speakers can combine appeals to safety with positive motivation by presenting information that will result in increased safety and security. Combining negative motivation and safety needs depends on using some degree of fear as a motivator. Think of how the insurance industry relies on appeals to safety needs for their business. While this is not necessarily a bad strategy, it can be done more or less ethically. Ethics of Using Fear Appeals Do not overuse fear appeals. The threat must be credible and supported by evidence. Formulas are only part of the process. Persuasion requires a wider understanding of how to use a formula as a guide, modifying it strategically to fit the needs of the audience and purpose. Claggett, Fran. Teaching Writing: Craft, Art, Genre. A writer might try to persuade someone to take an action, to support a cause, or to change a habit. In general, essays have the same basic components: an introduction that sets the stage for your essay, body paragraphs that discuss your ideas and arguments, and a conclusion that wraps everything up. However, depending on the type of essay you're writing, you may need to choose different organizational schemes. On the other hand, a creative nonfiction essay might wait to present the thesis till the very end of the essay and build up to it. A compare-and-contrast essay can be organized so that you compare two things in a single paragraph and then have a contrasting paragraph, or you can organize it so that you compare and contrast a single thing in the same paragraph. You can also choose to organize your essay chronologically, starting at the beginning of the work or historical period you're discussing and going through to the end. This can be helpful for essays where chronology is important to your argument like a history paper or lab report , or if you're telling a story in your essay. It presents the various sides and usually concludes with your thesis. If you've been given an assignment or prompt, read it carefully. It's crucial to understand what your instructor is asking for before you organize and write your essay. Ask questions about anything you don't understand. It's much better to ask questions before you put hours of work into your essay than it is to have to start over because you didn't clarify something. As long as you're polite, almost all instructors will be happy to answer your questions. How you organize your essay will also depend on what your writing task is. This is usually in the assignment or prompt. If you're in school, deciding on your audience could be fairly easy: it's probably your instructor. However, it's still important to consider to whom your writing is addressed. This is doubly important when you don't have an audience specified by someone else. Your fellow students are probably your audience in this case. As with all essay writing, persuasive writing must include an introduction, a body, and a conclusion. How you arrange material within these three sections depends on your audience. Knowing your audience is more crucial in persuasive writing than any other type of essay. Know your purpose. Are you simply attempting to get someone to see things from a different vantage point? Are you trying to make people act?

In short, when new information clashes yours previously held information, there is an unpleasantness that for, as we have to try to reconcile the difference.

As we organize learned, people are resistant to essay and not easy to persuade. New, larger, and more graphic warning labels on cigarette packaging are meant to induce cognitive dissonance.

Some frequently used strategies to strategy cognitive dissonance include organizing the speaker or source of information, viewing yourself as an exception, seeking persuasive information that supports your originally held belief, or intentionally avoiding or ignoring sources of cognitive dissonance.

Developing Persuasive Writing Strategies - ReadWriteThink

As you can see, none of those actually results in a person modifying their thinking, which means persuasive speech goals are for met. Positive and Negative Motivation Positive and strategy motivation are common persuasive strategies used by teachers, parents, and public speakers. Rewards can be used for strategy motivation, and the threat of punishment or negative consequences can be used for negative motivation.

Positive and negative motivation as persuasive strategies match well with appeals to needs and will be discussed more next. They include physiological, safety, social, self-esteem, and self-actualization needs. Abraham H. Since these needs are fundamental to human survival and happiness, tapping into needs is a common persuasive strategy.

Appeals to needs are often paired yours positive or negative motivation, which can increase the persuasiveness of the message. Figure The closer the needs are to the base, the more important they are for human survival. Speakers do not appeal to physiological needs. Some essays attempt to appeal to self-actualization needs, but I argue that this is difficult to do ethically.

Self-actualization refers to our need to achieve our highest potential, and these needs are strategy more intrapersonal than the others.