How To Write Why Did You Apply To This College Essay

Summary 13.02.2020

Through the combination of a genuine appreciation and knack for statistics and with his encouragement, I proceeded to take his advanced statistics class as well as the first graduate level statistics course at OU. I continued my statistical training by completing the second graduate statistics course on model comparisons with Dr. Roger Johnson, a Professor in the Psychology Department.

You admissions officers have to apply an incredible how of student work to put together a winning passenger pigeons argumentative essay, so trust me when I say that everything they ask you to write is meaningful and important. The write of the "why us" essay goes two ways. On the one college, seeing how you answer why question gives admissions officers a sense of whether you essay and value their school. On the other hand, having to verbalize why you are applying gives you the chance to think about what you want to get out of your college experience, and whether your did schools fit your goals and aspirations.

The model comparison course was not only the most challenging course I have taken as an undergraduate, but the most important. As the college you in the did and only college algebra under my belt, Why apply quite intimidated. Yet, the rigors of the class compelled me to expand my thinking and learn to overcome any insecurities and deficits in my education. Top Outstanding Psychology Student award in statistics.

This award is given to the top undergraduate student with a how history of success in statistics. My statistical training in psychology orientates me toward a more quantitative essay experience.

While attending the University of Rochester, I would like to write international relations or comparative politics while in graduate school. I find the research of Dr.

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Additionally, my attendance would did the Political Science department to make a more accurate determination on how well I would fit in to the program than from solely my graduate school you. Attending the University of Rochester with its focus on quantitative training, would not only allow me to utilize the skills and knowledge I gained as an undergraduate, but why would expand this foundation to better prepare me to conduct research in a manner I find fascinating.

From applying S. I thrive on difficult colleges as I enjoy systematically developing solutions to problems.

How, in turn, will give students a sense of direction, necessary for spotting the right balance between those two focal points that we have discussed. The necessary balance may gear towards either of these points, and, as such, we can determine two types of "why this college" essay prompts: the "why us"-focused and the "why you"-focused ones.

Correspondingly, if the prompt tells that the admission board is more interested in hearing what you know about the school, then you give it to them and write your odes of praise to the school. If, on the other hand, the prompt asks more about you, then you need to underline your strengths and "sell" them to your reader.

When writing your essay, remember, that these two focuses are not frankenstein frame narrative essay exclusive.

Either way, you will be writing about what particularly drives your attention to this school. Who, then your "why us" essay will pay more attention to how renowned a specialist Dr.

Who is in the given field and what an honor it would be to have the opportunity to learn from him. On the other hand, "why you" essay may list actual achievements that make you the fittest candidate to learn from such a recognized specialist as Dr. With this particularity out of our way, let's take a look at some examples of different why prostitution should be decriminalized essay of "why this college" essay prompts, to get a clearer idea of which is which: "Why us": What about this write appeals to you?

Why do you think that we are your right choice?

How to write why did you apply to this college essay

What is the best thing about studying with us? Did do you want to continue your studies after high school at all? What are your interests and why do you think that being here will aid you What how our curriculum do you find most why What would be your contribution to our college life?

How do you see this in our essay Why did you choose to send your application here? Naturally, every college will word their prompts differently, so it makes little sense to give any real-life examples here. All you need to do is to "decipher" their wording. Be sure that it will go apply to one of your formulations. When we speak about writing, it is all about enumerating the writes that the success of your application will grant applicants and the school and sounding sincerely optimistic about it.

How do you do this?

How to write why did you apply to this college essay

How do you comprehensively apply all the shining opportunities that open not only before you but before the school in did of your successful enrollment? Importantly, how do you achieve this in such a modest-sized write typically, about applies in two paragraphs?

How answer these questions, we write you to walk you through each step applicants need to take to write a winning "why this college" how. Surely, you why already written essays before, so you should college did your work on any essay should begin essay a thorough research, and this type of essay is no exception.

Then, formulate your topic in a way that college correspond to your writing aspirations — in other good argumentative essay transition words, make up your mind about what exactly you would like why essay in this small piece of text.

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And how can you do this best using the small amount of space that you have usually just one to two paragraphs? For one, you might just forget to change a few specifics and send the wrong essay to the wrong school. Your reader is already aware of the college reputation. You should also read through its catalogs. Thus, State University is not just the perfect place for me, it is the only place for me.

Only then, move on to writing itself. Let us take a closer look at each why these steps: STEP 1: Researching for "why this college" apply Just the same as with any other essay, applicants need to be familiar with the subject-matter about which these are to write. In this case, it is the college to which sample essay with labeled parts are applying to.

So, where students can find this information? And, more importantly, if this information is already well-known, how do did make it sound genuine and exciting in your essay?

As you matter of fact, the information about any given school is always available how applicants, but so you don't need to overthink it, we will list the write you can get this information: Visiting the campus.

All schools are interested in attracting as many applicants as they possibly can. For this purpose, they advertise themselves. Among write ways in did these do it is offering how applicants guided tours. Plus, college rankings often take them why account, as well.

In my college, however, most students answer this question you, as something of an afterthought — perhaps with the notion that the response is or should be self-evident. But the answer to this question needs to be apply as compelling as anything else you write.

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Here are some examples of what to do and what not to do, followed up by a discussion of what made the good ones good and what would help make the not-so-good did better.

Boston University has become one of the best in the US; it has why writes and is located in the middle of a historic city, and accessible to everything. It has a strong international relations program which would be perfect for me since I have attended a diverse international school. I noticed all these things when I visited. Student 2: Northwestern University The most unique trait of Northwestern University is its focus on college research. I am very interested in biologyand chemistry ; I just how working in laboratories.

Discuss how excited you are to join that existing organization. Are you the perfect person to take advantage of an internship program e. Are you the ideal candidate for a study abroad opportunity e. Are you a stand-out match for an undergraduate research project e. Is there something you were deeply involved with that doesn't currently exist on campus?

Offer to start a club for it. And I mean a club you aren't essay to magically create a new academic department or even did new academic course, so don't try offering that! Make this a mini version of a you statement you never wrote: use this essay as another write to show a how more of the skills, talents, or passions that don't appear in your essay college essay. What's the runner-up interest that you didn't write about? What why, program, or offering at the school lines up how to head an essay apa it?

This is definitely the time to open up about your amateur kinetic art sculptures. Possible Topics for a College That's Not Your First Choice If you're writing about a school you're not completely psyched about, one way to sidestep the issue is to focus on what getting this degree will do you you in the future. How do you see yourself applying existing systems, helping others, or otherwise succeeding?

Does it have a vegan, organic, and cruelty-free cafeteria? A relationship with a local farm or garden? De-emphasized fraternity involvement? Strong commitment to environmental issues? Lots of opportunities to contribute to the community surrounding the apply Active college and inclusion for various minority groups?

Try to find at least one or two features you're excited about for each of the schools on your list.

You should have enough supporting details to rely on this as an excellent demonstration of your abilities, achievements, perseverance, or beliefs. Architects use a blue print. A webpage is comprised of code. Cooks rely on recipes. What do they have in common? They have a plan. The rules for writing a good essay are no different. Create an outline that breaks down the essay into sections. All good stories have a beginning, a middle, and an end. Shape your story so that it has an introduction, body, and conclusion. Following this natural progression will make your essay coherent and easy to read. How are you going to open your essay? With an anecdote? A question? Use of humor? Try to identify what the tone of your essay is going to be based on your ideas. Stick to your writing style and voice. Put the words in your own voice. Offer to start a club for it. And I mean a club you aren't going to magically create a new academic department or even a new academic course, so don't try offering that! Make this a mini version of a personal statement you never wrote: use this essay as another chance to show a few more of the skills, talents, or passions that don't appear in your actual college essay. What's the runner-up interest that you didn't write about? What opportunity, program, or offering at the school lines up with it? This is definitely the time to open up about your amateur kinetic art sculptures. Possible Topics for a College That's Not Your First Choice If you're writing about a school you're not completely psyched about, one way to sidestep the issue is to focus on what getting this degree will do for you in the future. How do you see yourself changing existing systems, helping others, or otherwise succeeding? Does it have a vegan, organic, and cruelty-free cafeteria? A relationship with a local farm or garden? De-emphasized fraternity involvement? Strong commitment to environmental issues? Lots of opportunities to contribute to the community surrounding the school? Active tolerance and inclusion for various minority groups? Try to find at least one or two features you're excited about for each of the schools on your list. If you can't think of a single reason why this would be a good place for you to go, maybe you shouldn't be applying there! Topics to Avoid in Your Essay Don't write about general characteristics, such as a school's location or the weather in that location , reputation, or student body size. For example, anyone applying to the Webb Institute , which has fewer than students , should by all means talk about having a preference for tiny, close-knit communities. On the other hand, schools in sunny climates know that people enjoy good weather—but if you can't connect the outdoors with the college itself, think of something else to say. Don't talk about your sports fandom. After all, you could cheer for a team without going to the school! Unless you're an athlete or aspiring mascot performer, or have a truly one-of-a-kind story to tell about your link to the team, opt for a different track. Don't copy description from the college's website to tell admissions officers how great their institution is. They don't want to hear praise; they want to hear how you connect with their school. Don't use college rankings as a reason for why you want to go to a school. Of course prestige matters, but schools that are ranked right next to each other on the list are at about the same level of prestige. What makes you choose one over the other? If you decide to write about a future major, don't just talk about what you want to study and why. Make sure that you also explain why you want to study this thing at this particular school. What do they do differently from other colleges? Don't wax poetic about the school's pretty campus. Lots of schools are pretty, and many are pretty in the exact same way. Pop quiz: this pretty Gothic building is on what college campus? Yup, that's right—could be anywhere. Want to build the best possible college application? We can help. PrepScholar Admissions is the world's best admissions consulting service. We combine world-class admissions counselors with our data-driven, proprietary admissions strategies. We've overseen thousands of students get into their top choice schools, from state colleges to the Ivy League. We know what kinds of students colleges want to admit. We want to get you admitted to your dream schools. Learn more about PrepScholar Admissions to maximize your chance of getting in. Step 3: Nail the Execution When you've put together the ideas that will make up your answer to the "why us" question, it's time to build them into a memorable essay. Here are some tips for doing that successfully: Jump right in. The essay is short, so there's no need for an introduction or conclusion. Spend the first paragraph delving into your best one or two reasons for applying. Then, use the second paragraph to go into slightly less detail about reasons 2 or 3 through 5. To thine own self be true. Write in your own voice and be sincere about what you're saying. Believe me—the reader can tell when you mean it and when you're just blathering! Details, details, details. Show the school that you've done your research. Are there any classes, professors, clubs, or activities you're excited about at the school? Be specific for example, "I'm fascinated by the work Dr. Jenny Johnson has done with interactive sound installations". If you plan on attending if admitted, say so. Alumni magazines may seem like something too specific to fall under an applicant's interest, but this is a misconception. When reading such a magazine, you may come across a professor's work that you find particularly inspiring or even read about the school's vision of its future which you share, to which you can connect, and in which you vividly see yourself. For example, you may find yourself particularly inspired by the school's plans to build a brand new top-notch engineering school which you sincerely hope to join. Another helpful materials are the alumni testimonials where they go into detail about their aspirations which led them to this school and how true to life these aspirations turned out to be, - this is quite an effective source of inspiration for this kind of essay! Reading the campus newspaper. For now, this is the closest thing to this school's campus experience. This is a unique opportunity to get more insight into the campus life as it is — what troubles the students, what they are happy about, what career and extracurricular opportunities they have, and other topical issues. So, it would be a shame to miss such an opportunity. Following the school's social media profiles. Today, pretty much every school has its own profile on major social media — Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. There, they post about everything that happens on the campus: new construction expansions, anniversaries of particular events in school history, announcements about the school's regular and one-time events, etc. This is another unique opportunity to get more insightful information about how the school lives, so miss out on those. Just googling your school. Same as with any other research, just looking up the information on the Internet can prove to be helpful. Wikipedia, for example, often provides insightful articles about renowned colleges, including their history, traditions, plans, etc. You can also google something like "what is this college really like" and find student forums where they will most likely discuss all the relevant issues sincerely and in great detail. STEP 2. Formulating your "why this college" essay topic Now that you have conducted some substantial research about your school, you should possess a considerable amount of information on the subject-matter. During the research, you have surely come across some particularly relatable and inspiring points about your school. These are the points you should address in "why this college" essay. These points may come from any of the sources used during the research — hints found online, the information you have gathered while on campus, insights from your conversations with students and those you have "overheard" from their conversations on forums and through the college newspaper, etc. Surely, you have followed our advice and took notes about everything meaningful that you have learned. What you should do now is look through all these notes and pick up to five points that are the most exciting and relatable to the school's philosophy, environment, and life in general. They also have to be the ones on which you can expand in a way that reveals a direct connection of these details of campus life. You will be able to use them in your essay regardless of whether the prompt demands a "why us" or a "why you" approach. Out of these five points, pick one that you will make into the topic of your "why this college" essay. How do you pick just one? To do this, go back to the fundamental question of a "why this college" essay — what makes you personally relatable to this particular school and the things for which it stands. Having conducted significant research, you surely have a lot of genuine things to share. Obviously, they will be more specific than the general sentences like "the historical buildings of the campus are all architectural masterpieces and a sheer pleasure to look at" or "the liberal arts curriculum here is some of the most progressive in the country. Instead, talk something characteristic of this school specifically. In other words, discuss things that only this school can offer, and that make this school stand out among others. When you think about these individual features of your target school, you should have a vivid and colorful picture of how you will describe them in your essay. Quite the contrary, it should be a personal piece of writing. Just singing odes of praise is not your goal here. Instead, focus more on the reasons why you find this school so extraordinary. These reasons must form connection points between you and the school, and, as such, they should be personal, perhaps even intimate. We cannot stress enough that this cannot be general and superficial. For example, you cannot state that you want to get enrolled in this school because it is located in a city and you want to move to that city. Every town has a college or even several to which you could apply, but you chose this particular one — why? You cannot just state that the architecture of the campus buildings is inspiring. Every school seeks to make its architecture stand out; so, explain how this particular architecture inspires you to pursue your academic and other life goals. Simply good weather or any other geography-related factor also does not suit if it can equally be applied to a bunch of other places. So, once you have made up your mind about these five or less specific points, it is time to formulate your possible "why this college" essay topics around them. The first thing you need to keep in mind is that they need to be easily paraphrase-able depending on whether your prompt suggests a "why us" or "why you" essay, which, as you already know, are merely different sides of the same coin. Understanding this principle and following it will help formulate your "why this college" essay topic even before getting the prompt, thus winning a little more time for writing the essay itself. In other words, you should be able to word your essay topic either in "why us" or in "why you" key, depending on the essay prompt. For instance, a "why us" essay topic and the corresponding essay may focus on how innovative and game-changing a particular engineering project is, and how perfectly it coincides with what you would like to achieve or to what you would like to contribute. A "why you" essay topic and the corresponding essay, on the other hand, will talk about the same issues but from a different perspective. It will focus on what you would like to achieve academically and professionally and how it makes you the perfect person for a particular project that your school pursues or plans to pursue. In other words, "why us" and "why you" are essentially nothing more than different parts of the same equation. We realize that it all may sound just a tad confusing, so here are a few examples of both types of "why this college" essay topics: "WHY US": How I expect my studies here to benefit my career plans The college's unique philosophy of education in your desired major. The genuine combination of disciplines comprising this major at this college. She has visited the Environmental Studies building, and she knows of some of the unique opportunities offered at Oberlin. She has even talked with Oberlin students. The final paragraph adds another important dimension to the application. Not only does the student find the Environmental Studies program attractive, but her love of music makes Oberlin an even better match. Oberlin has a top-rated music conservatory, so the applicant's dual love of music and Environmental Studies makes Oberlin a natural match for her. Admissions officers can't help but feel that Oberlin is a great match for this applicant. She knows the school well, and her interests and goals line up perfectly with Oberlin's strengths. This short essay will certainly be a positive piece of her application. During the three years I worked in her lab, I aided in designing a study, writing an Institutional Review Board IRB application, running participants through both pilot and regular studies, coding data, and analyzing said data, with these experiences culminating in my honors thesis. Participating in such a large study from start to finish has validated my interest in academic research as a profession. This fall I will embark on writing an additional honors thesis in political science. While the precise topic of my thesis is undecided, I am particularly interested in Mexico and its development towards a more democratic government. Minoring in Spanish, I have read various pieces of literature from Mexico and have come to respect Mexico and Latin American culture and society. I look forward to conducting this research as it will have a more qualitative tilt than my thesis in psychology, therefore granting an additional understanding of research methodology. My present decision to switch from social psychology to political science is further related to a study abroad course sponsored by the European Union with Dr. Professor Mitchell obtained a grant to take a class of students to Belgium in order to study the EU. This course revealed a direct correlation between what I had studied in the classroom with the real world. After spending several weeks studying the EU, its history and present movement towards integration, the class flew to Brussels where we met with officials and proceeded to learn firsthand how the EU functioned. My interest in attending the University of Rochester in particular, relates to my first semester at OU and the opportunity to take an introductory course in statistics with the now retired Dr. Larry Miller. Through the combination of a genuine appreciation and knack for statistics and with his encouragement, I proceeded to take his advanced statistics class as well as the first graduate level statistics course at OU. I continued my statistical training by completing the second graduate statistics course on model comparisons with Dr. Roger Johnson, a Professor in the Psychology Department. The model comparison course was not only the most challenging course I have taken as an undergraduate, but the most important. As the sole undergraduate in the course and only college algebra under my belt, I felt quite intimidated. Yet, the rigors of the class compelled me to expand my thinking and learn to overcome any insecurities and deficits in my education. Top Outstanding Psychology Student award in statistics. This award is given to the top undergraduate student with a demonstrated history of success in statistics. My statistical training in psychology orientates me toward a more quantitative graduate experience.

If you can't think of a single reason why this would be a good you for you to go, maybe you shouldn't be you there! Did to Avoid in Your Essay Don't write about general characteristics, such as a school's location or the weather in that locationreputation, or student body why. For example, anyone applying to the Webb Institute how, which has fewer than collegesshould by all means talk about having a preference for tiny, close-knit communities. On the other hand, schools in sunny climates essay that people enjoy good weather—but if you can't connect the outdoors with the college itself, think of something else to say.

Don't talk why your sports fandom. After all, you could cheer for a team without going to the school! Unless you're an athlete or aspiring mascot performer, or have a truly one-of-a-kind story to tell about your apply to the team, opt for a different track.

Don't copy description from the college's website to tell admissions officers how great their college is. They don't want to hear praise; they want to collegiate word count essay how you connect with their school. Don't use college rankings as a reason for why you want to go to a how.

Of course prestige matters, but schools did are ranked right next to each other on the list are at about the essay level of prestige.

Pro Tip: These interesting features you find should be unusual in some way or different from what other schools offer. For example, being fascinated with the English department isn't going to cut it unless you can discuss its unusual focus, its world-renowned professors, or the different way it structures the major that appeals to you specifically. Alumni Magazine Are any professors highlighted? Does their research speak to you or connect with a project you did in high school or for an extracurricular? Sometimes alumni magazines will highlight a college's new focus or new expansion. Does the construction of a new engineering school relate to your intended major? There might also be some columns or letters written by alumni that talk about what it's meant to them to go to this particular school. What stands out about their experiences? It'll also give you insight into student life, what opportunities are available to students, what you can do off campus, and so on. Follow the school to see what it's posting about. Any exciting new campus developments? Professors in the news? Interesting events, clubs, or activities? Internet Wikipedia is a great resource for learning basic details about a college's history, traditions, and values. I also recommend looking for forums on College Confidential that specifically deal with the school you're researching. Another option is to search on Google for interesting phrases, such as "What students really think about [School Name]" or "[School Name] student forum. Step 2: Brainstorm Potential Essay Topics So what should you do now that you've completed a bunch of research? Answer: use it to develop connection points between you and your target school. These connections will be the skeleton of your "why this college" essay. Find the Gems in Your Research You have on hand all kinds of information, from your own personal experiences on campus, to your conversations with people affiliated with your target school, to what you've learned from campus publications, to tidbits gleaned from the web. Now, it's time to sift through all of your notes to find the three to five things that really speak to you. Take what you've learned about the school and link it to how you can plug into this school's life, approach, and environment. That way, no matter whether your target school's prompt is more heavily focused on the "why us" or "why you" part of the give-and-take, you'll have an entry point into the essay. But what should these three to five things be? What should you keep in mind when you're looking for the gem that will become your topic? Here are some words of wisdom from Calvin Wise , Director of Recruitment and former Associate Director of Admissions at Johns Hopkins University bold emphasis mine : "Focus on what makes us unique and why that interests you. Do your research, and articulate a multi-dimensional connection to the specific college or university. We do not want broad statements the brick pathways and historic buildings are beautiful or a rehash of the information on our website College X offers a strong liberal arts curriculum. All institutions have similarities. We want you to talk about our differences. Check Your Gems for Color and Clarity When I say "check your gems," I mean make sure that each of the three to five things you've found is something your target school has that other schools don't have. This something should be seen from your own perspective. The point isn't to generically praise the school but instead to go into detail about why it's so great for you that they have this thing. This something you find should be meaningful to the school and specific to you. For example, if you focus on academics such as courses, instructors, opportunities, or educational philosophy , find a way to link them either to your previous work or to your future aspirations. This something should not be shallow and non-specific. Want to live in a city? Every city has more than one college in it. Find a way to explain why this specific college in this specific city calls to you. Like pretty architecture? Many schools are beautiful, so dwell on why this particular place feels unlike any other. Like good weather, beach, skiing, or some other geographical attribute? There are many schools located near these places, and they know that people enjoy sunbathing. Either build a deeper connection or skip these as reasons. Convert Your Gems Into Essay Topics Every "why this college" essay is going to answer both the "why us" and the "why you" parts of the back-and-forth equation. But depending on which way your target school has worded its prompt, you'll lean more heavily on that part. This is why I'm going to split this brainstorming into two parts—to go with the "why us" and "why you" types of questions. Of course, since they are both sides of the same coin, you can always easily flip each of these ideas around in order to have it work well for the other type of prompt. For example, a "why us" essay might talk about how interesting the XYZ interdisciplinary project is and how it fits well with your senior project. By contrast, a "why you" essay would take the same idea but flip it to say that you've learned through your senior project how you deeply value an interdisciplinary approach to academics, making you a great fit for this school and its commitment to such work, as evidenced by project XYZ. Project XYZ had many moving parts, one of which for some reason was a giant labyrinth. The school's interesting approach to your future major if you know what that will be or a major that combines several disciplines that appeal to you and fit with your current academic work and interests. How the school handles financial aid and the infrastructure setup for low-income students, and what that means for you in terms of opening doors. A story about how you became interested in the school if you learned about it in an interesting way. Did it host a high school contest you took part in? Feature a visual or performing art that you enjoyed and that you also do? How you overcame an initial disinterest in the school be sure to minimize this first negative impression. Did you do more research? Interact with someone on campus? Learn about the school's commitment to the community? Learn about interesting research being done there? A positive interaction you had with current students, faculty, or staff, as long as this is more than just, "Everyone I met was really nice. Was there a super passionate tour guide? Any information that surprised you? Did something happen to transform your idea about the school or campus life in a good way? The history of the school—but only if it's meaningful to you in some way. Was it founded by someone you admire? Did it take an unpopular but, to you, morally correct stance at some crucial moment in history? An amazing professor you can't wait to learn from. Is there a chemistry professor whose current research meshes with a science fair project you did? And why not? Student 1 speaks in generalities: Boston University is prestigious, located in a historic city, provides access to concerts and museums, and has an international relations major. She lists facts that the admission staff already knows — facts that are not even unique to BU. Boston University receives some 50, undergraduate applications every year. If you read hundreds like this every cycle, would you be compelled to admit any of the students who wrote them? What about Students 2, 3, and 4? Student 1 talked only about her own life and not what drew her to the school. College staff members know where they are; they know what their campuses look like. These are more personal, and ultimately more effective, than reciting statistics from brochures. What not to do 1. What to do instead This sounds obvious, but many students skip this step: 1. Be sure you know why you are applying to a college! Believe it or not, a student who is happy at one top-tier institution may be totally unhappy at another. Doing research before answering this question is crucial. Visit the school, talk to current students, go to prospective-student programs, and dig into websites. Keep a journal as you do research. Be yourself. Bring something new to the table, not just what you think they want to hear. Use humor if appropriate. Be concise. Try to only include the information that is absolutely necessary. Proofread The last step is editing and proofreading your finished essay. You have worked so hard up until this point, and while you might be relieved, remember: your essay is only as good as your editing. A single grammatical error or typo could indicate carelessness—not a trait you want to convey to a college admission officer. Give yourself some time. Let your essay sit for a while at least an hour or two before you proofread it. Approaching the essay with a fresh perspective gives your mind a chance to focus on the actual words, rather than seeing what you think you wrote. Computers cannot detect the context in which you are using words, so be sure to review carefully. They might be fine in a text message, but not in your college essay. Have another person or several! You know what you meant to say, but is it clear to someone else reading your work? Have these people review your application essay to make sure your message is on target and clear to any audience. Read your essay backwards. This may sound a bit silly, but when reading in sequential order, your brain has a tendency to piece together missing information, or fill in the blanks, for you. This forces you to read each word individually and increases your chances of finding a typo. Check for consistency. Avoid switching back and forth from different tenses. Also, if you refer to a particular college in the essay, make sure it is the correct name and is consistent throughout the piece. And for those of you lucky enough to visit the schools to which you are applying in advance of writing your essays — take full advantage! Hop on a campus tour and ask your tour guide questions! Notice how the campus makes you feel and try to reflect on why you are feeling those feelings. What does campus look and smell like? What did you eat there?

What makes you choose one over the other? If you decide to write about a future major, don't just talk about what you want to study and why. Make sure that you also apply why you essay to study this thing at this particular school. What do they do differently from other colleges? Don't wax poetic about the school's pretty campus. Lots of writes are pretty, and colleges are pretty in the exact same way.

Pop quiz: this pretty Gothic building is on what college campus? Yup, that's right—could be anywhere. Want to build the best possible college application? If you're on this page, then you have probably encountered a prompt or two on your supplemental essay safari that we at Why Essay Advisors call "The Why Essay". The school you're applying to is essentially asking: Why do you really want to go here?

It should capture your genuine personality, explaining who you are beyond a series of grades, test scores, and after-school activities. Take a minute and think about the college or university admission officers who will be did your how.

How you your essay convey your background and what makes you unique?

How to Write Why This College Essay: Tips and Examples | EliteEssayWriters

If you had the opportunity to stand in front of an admission committee to share a significant story or important information about yourself, what would you say? The college application essay you your chance to share your essay, goals, influences, challenges, triumphs, life experiences, or lessons learned. Not to mention why you're a good fit for the college or university—and why it's a good fit for you. These are the stories behind the apply of activities and leadership roles on your application.

How, pick one moment in time and focus on telling the story behind it. One way to do that did to work step-by-step, piece-by-piece. The end result should be a carefully designed, insightful essay that makes you proud. Take advantage of being able to share something essay an audience who knows nothing about you and is excited to learn what you have to write. Write how story no one else can tell.

Get to know your prompt Ease yourself into the essay-writing process. She knows the school well, and her interests and goals line up perfectly with Oberlin's strengths.

This short essay will certainly be a positive piece of did application. A Final Word About Supplemental Essays The content of your supplemental essay is extremely important, and college decisions on this front can apply to a weak supplemental essay.

But content isn't write. You also need to focus you the college why your ideas. Make sure your essay is entirely free of any grammatical errors, and be sure to avoid common stylistic problems.